21 Best Concealed Carry Guns

21 Best Concealed Carry Guns in 9mm (2019)

Below are what we consider the 21 best 9mm concealed carry guns with a little bonus at the end. We will get into the nitty-gritty from real world experience (mostly mine, but I did have some help).

We also have articles covering the Best Holsters, Best Belts, and Best Self Defense Ammo! These are the must haves to go with your carry gun.


Before we begin we should apologize to the “My Pistol is A One-Shot Death-Ray” .45 ACP fans and the “My Caliber is Better than Every Other Caliber” .40 S&W fans. We have plans to get into those as well, but we need to locate and shoot the guns and that takes time and money.

Until then, you have a heartfelt apology from all of us “Shot Placement is Everything” 9mm folks.

Anyway, on to what you came here for!


Glock

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

Glock 19

Compact

$599

15+1

23.65

4.99

1.18

7.36

Glock 26

Sub Compact

$599

10+1

21.17

4.17

1.18

6.49

Glock 43

Slimline

$500

6+1

17.95

4.25

1.02

6.26

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Glock 19

G19

Few modern firearms are as prolific as the G19. It had some bad press and negative reviews back in the 90's, but overcame those to become probably the most carried firearm for both civilians and police forces worldwide. It has earned its reputation despite some criticism and the ‘Tupperware pistol’ moniker.

Even if you hate Glocks, accept that G19 is the standard on which modern day carry pistols are graded. When we look at size, weight, and capacity in modern handguns, our perception of those numbers is based on the Glock even if we don’t realize it.

Glocks were a revolution and existed without challenge for over a decade, but as more companies enter the striker-fired, polymer pistol market, Glock is going to have some stiff competition. Still, for size, weight, and price there are few guns that can beat a Glock. I have carried the G19 for years and have learned to trust it. View the Glock 19 here at Brownells.

View Our Recommended Holster

Glock 26

G26

Though it never gained the reputation and following of the Glock 19, the G26 has held its own in the subcompact market. The main criticism being the loss of a third of the ammo capacity of a G19 but not a lot of difference in size and weight.

If you took a G19 and you sort of did a little surgery on it, you would get the G26. You get a 10-round magazine as standard, but the G26 is less than an inch shorter overall than the G19 and is almost the same weight.  You save about 3 ounces.  For most people, it's hard to justify sacrificing that much firepower for so little savings.

The original G26 had almost identical internals to the G19. The modern G26 has been updated to deal with the lighter slide and stiffer recoil. These improvements have made it a viable choice in a crowded handgun market.  It is also markedly more accurate and easier to shoot than those early versions. If the G19 is just a bit too big, the G26 is probably in the Goldilocks Zone.

View Our Recommended Holster

Glock 43

G43

For decades Glock enthusiasts begged for a single stack 9mm. At the time, most companies producing single stack 9mm pistols were adequate at best.  We screamed that Glock could make a killing!  Sig did it, and were selling them like hot cakes. Still, Shot Show after Shot Show, we were disappointed. Until the release of the 42 in .380 in 2012.  That is when we dared to hope!

I truly believe it was the success of the Ruger LC9 and the rumored S&W Shield that really lit the fire under Glock’s butt. When it was finally announced at Shot Show 2015, every gun store in my region was blanketed in pre-orders.  It was almost a year before someone could walk in and buy one out of the case.

Was it worth the wait? To some, very much so.  The G43 is a fine little firearm. It is surprisingly accurate if a little rough on the recoil. In the slim-line, single-stack market, this is among the best. If you are one of those people who lacks the size to conceal most guns, I would recommend swinging by the local shop and trying one of these out.

View Our Recommended Holster

SIG SAUER

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

P320 Compact

Compact

$679

15+1

25.80

5.30

1.30

7.20

P320 Sub Compact

Sub Compact

$679

12+1

24.90

4.70

1.30

6.70

P365

Slimline

$599

10+1

17.80

4.30

1.00

5.80

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Sig P320 Compact

320c

Sig handguns have always had a well-deserved reputation for reliability, craftsmanship, and dead on accuracy. For many, it was no surprise that the U.S. military selected a Sig to replace the aging Beretta M9.  Rather than offer a current production model, Sig went above and beyond to make sure the P320 had everything the military needed in a handgun. View the Sig P320 here at Brownells.

While Sigs are far from the cheapest option for a carry gun, you get a lot of quality for your money. With the P320 you also get a modular system that can change grips, lengths, and even calibers with the right parts. There is a reason why the military chose this pistol. Though I haven’t had the most experience with it, I have found it to be a solid, robust, accurate choice for those who want to spend the money on one.

View Our Recommended Holster

Sig P320 Subcompact

320sc

Let’s make this easy by saying that everything that applies to the compact also applies to the subcompact with the exceptions of ammo capacity, weight, and size. Much like the Glocks above, the size and weight difference is minimal, but if you need something just a tad smaller, the subcompact will deliver!

This is still a modular weapon that can be changed to different frames and calibers if you want to spend the money on the parts to do so. Personally, I believe this is a fine carry gun without the modular options.  You can just buy this gun and you are set. 

Sig P365

P365

When it comes to guns, words like ‘revolutionary’ get thrown around a lot. Most of the time a gun isn’t really that innovative, they’re just remakes or rebrands of existing ideas. The Sig P365 is much like other pistols in that respect.  In many ways, it doesn’t differ a lot from the S&W Shield or Glock 43.

But where it does differ is very important. The P365 is roughly the same size as most slimline pistols, but has a capacity of 10 rounds to their 6 or 7. Firepower like that is competitive with most sub-compact models, but the Sig is only an inch wide. View the Sig P365 here at Brownells.

It may not be a huge revolution in gun technology, but it is enough to make the P365 a contender. Especially with a price that is similar to other handguns in its class.

Now there have been some issues reported with this firearm shortly after release, and some still reporting some issues. Sig has reported they have fixed the early issues and time will tell how the P365 handles in the long run.  I have this gun and it is fun to shoot...but I'm waiting to put it into my carry rotation until it has proven itself, just like any carry gun should.

View Our Recommended Holster

SPRINGFIELD ARMORY

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

XD Mod 2 Service

Compact

$565

16+1

27.50

5.50

1.20

7.30

XD Mod 2 Sub 

Sub Compact

$565

13+1

26.00

4.75

1.19

6.25

XD-S

Slimline

$499

7+1

23.00

4.40

0.90

6.30

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XD Mod2 Service

XD2service

Let’s face it, when the XD pistols came out back in the early 2000's, they were a little bit of a flop. Whether or not it was intentional, they were more a ‘Here is a gun for people who don’t like Glocks’ option rather than a decent pistol in their own right. It took a few years and a few versions before they got everything nailed down.

The new Mod 2 models have exceeded expectations and are a decent, solid pistol. One thing that is immediately noticeable is the feel of the pistol.  As far as ergonomics go, this is one of the best pistols on the market provided you have the hand size to fit it. The new XD ergonomics provide an accurate shooting platform that keeps your muzzle down and your sights on target.

The Mod 2 has a great ammo capacity and is very concealable for a gun in the compact category. It may not be the Glock Killer that Springfield wanted, but that’s ok, all it needs to be is a good pistol.

XD-Mod2 Subcompact

XD2subcompact

The sub-compact is just a shrunk down version of the compact as is usual in the firearms market. It has most of the same features as the larger XD with just enough taken off to make it more concealable.

What is notable about this sub-compact is the ergonomics, which amazingly haven’t changed from the service model.  Like the service model, this gun is thin but offers a greater ammo capacity than most other guns in its size.  The handle has a bit more length than the standard which helps to keep a firm purchase on the gun. All in all, I would call this a fine weapon.

XD-S

XDS

Springfield’s entry into the world of single-stack slimline pistols is also surprisingly good. For a pistol that is a mere nine-tenths of an inch thick, it manages to be comfortable to hold and fire. Let’s face it, slimline pistols are hard to make.  It takes a lot of engineering to get it right.  Though I admit some surprise, the XD-S has pulled it off.

This little slimline has most of the features and function of the larger XD pistols and doesn’t sacrifice much for its smaller size. It is also surprisingly accurate.  The XD-S is among the thinnest slimline pistols on the market, but manages to hold its own with a solid 7 round capacity. I have always been a fan of Springfield 1911's. It’s about time they made a proper polymer pistol that we can be proud of.

HECKLER & KOCH

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

H&K VP9

Compact

$719

15+1

25.56

5.41

1.32

7.34

H&K VP9SK

Sub Compact

$719

10+1

23.07

4.57

1.31

6.61

H&K P30SK

Sub Compact

$719

10+1

23.99

4.57

1.37

6.42

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H&K VP9

VP9

Other than Glock, I can’t think of any other company that has such a long running reputation of tough, dependable firearms as H&K. When I was first getting into the world of handguns, the HK USP had an almost mystical following.  Back then, it was a legend.  The VP9 is the updated great-grandson of that firearm.

By combining the best of 30+ years of their own experience with the experience of some of the superstars of the market, H&K has delivered a gem of a gun. The balance is among the best of modern poly pistols and even those who often complain about the accuracy of striker fired handguns seem to shut up once they have fired it.

Though they run a little expensive, if you are after a H&K compact handgun, you won’t be disappointed by the VP9. It carries well, shoots well, and will last a lifetime.  If I had a complaint, it would be that the gun is a little tall at the grip which can make it print if you are a smaller statured person.

H&K VP9SK

VP9SK

With the scaled down version of the VP9, you can count on the same quality and reliability. There is no reason to expect otherwise from H&K.  Strangely, I find that the SK model actually points better and is a more natural pistol to fire. Follow up shots are slower, as you would expect, but the shorter sight radius seems to work for this gun. 

It also addresses the issue with the height of the grip that gave me problems with the standard VP9. Of course, you are giving up 5 rounds to do so.  The 4.5-inch height brings it more in line with other sub-compact pistols, but the accuracy sets it apart. View the VP9SK here at Brownells.

H&K P30SK

P30SK

The P30SK is a near clone of the VP9SK, but in a hammer fired pistol instead of striker fired. I believe this was done to placate some old-timers that feel they need a hammer for safety and maybe because there are a few police and military organizations that require handguns with a hammer. Otherwise, this is just like the VP9 series.  Well, almost.

The main benefit of the P30SK is its modularity. If you have smaller hands, the thinner grips can help. It also carries a little better in the appendix position where most of the slide is hidden behind the belt.

In a straight up race, the P30 and the VP9 in the SK model are neck and neck. Both are great quality firearms for the same price.

SMITH & WESSON

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

M&P9C 2.0

Compact

$569

15+1

24.00

5.00

1.18

7.25

M&P Shield 2.0

Slimline

$479

7+1

18.30

4.60

1.18

6.10

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S&W M&P 9c 2.0

mp9c

I will openly admit that there are some guns that have just left a bad taste in my mouth and the prejudice has been hard to overcome. Back in the mid-90's, Smith & Wesson forever tarnished my faith in their otherwise excellent firearms when they released the Sigma.  What a load of crap! It was nothing more than an expensive paperweight.

So, when they released the M&P series in 2005, I was less than enthused. It was almost 5 years later that I actually got around to firing one and only because a friend begged me to. My initial impression was that the trigger was a little rough, but I was overall impressed.  I still haven’t forgiven them for the Sigma though, but I am closer than I was.

The M&P series has produced some great guns, among the best striker fired pistols on the market for sure! They are accurate, available, easy to use, and more affordable than I would have expected from S&W.  I have to give it to them for doing it right. The 2.0 fixed that crappy trigger too! View the M&P 2.0 here at Brownells.

S&W M&P Shield 2.0

mpshield

Now that we have talked about my prejudice, I have to say I was a little excited to hear about the shield back in 2012. It was the single stack 9mm that everyone had wanted from Glock but wouldn’t get for another 3 years.  I will still admit that I owned a Glock 43 before I got around to getting a Shield.

For smaller statured people or in lighter clothing, this is a superb carry gun. The size is exactly what it needs to be and the gun is accurate despite its size (for the life of me, I can’t ever keep one from hitting about 3” left). This is a pistol that just works and though it may be a little less durable than the Glock, it’s still a tough little carry gun.

Not to mention that they are CHEAP! If you shop around you can get one in the $350.00 range or the Performance Center model for under $500.00. View the Shield 2.0 here at Brownells to see the current price!

View Our Recommended Holster

KAHR

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

Kahr CM9

Slimline

$460

6+1

15.90

4.00

0.90

5.42

Kahr CW9

Slimline

$449

7+1

17.70

4.50

0.90

5.90

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Kahr CM9 & Kahr CW9

CM9
CW9

When I went into this project, I had very little experience with Kahr firearms. Sure, I had seen and held them and even fired some back in the early 2000's, but they sort of dropped off my radar. These are what I would consider a second tier firearm and I want the best.  So, when I began looking into pistols that people were carrying, I was surprised to see so many had chosen a Kahr.

Though I am still a little trepidatious about these little Kahrs, I am willing to admit that the ones I fired performed admirably. They were actually far better than what I expected.  They seem to have a few hiccups until you break them in, but they ran like a champ after the first couple hundred rounds.

The CM9 and CW9 are so close in specs that I would be hard pressed to tell the difference from across a room. The CW is just a hair larger than the CM.  Both are thinner than either my Shield or G43 which is surprising.  They do have a solid recoil that can make keeping them on target a challenge.

If a Kahr is what you are looking for, they will do you very well, but you can honestly get a better gun for the same price.

WALTHER

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

Walther PPQ

Compact

$649

15+1

24.50

5.30

1.30

7.10

Walther PPS M2

Slimline

$499

6+1

21.10

4.40

1.00

6.30

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Walther PPQ

PPQ

How could I possibly let this go without mentioning Walther? They are the granddaddy of compact, concealable pistols after all. Who else has a firearm as reputable as the PPK, one carried by the likes of James Bond himself?

But that's old news. The new news is that the Walthers have made a comeback after some not so stellar performance back in the late 90's. The PPQ is a great little compact option for those who want a little history behind their guns.  If you are in a Bond mood, get a suit and grab one of these, it will cover you if you should need it.

The PPQ isn’t exactly the smallest, lightest, or most affordable compact pistol, but it isn’t the heaviest or most costly either. Walther found a comfortable middle ground that I think most people could live with.  These new models are quite accurate and seem to function well, if not so well as some of the more esteemed competitors.

Walther PPS M2

PPSM2

Now, if you want a real spiritual successor to that PPK that Bond carried way back in Dr. No, it's the PPS. It’s thin, small, and has a little weight to it, just like an actual PPK.  But rather than that bland little .32 ACP you get a solid hitting 9mm.

The recoil on the PPS M2 is manageable, about what you would expect out of a gun this size.  I have to say that this was one of the more enjoyable guns that I fired in preparation for this article. Maybe it was the gun or maybe it was my inner Bond.

THE REST OF THE GANG

There were a few guns that just had a single gun to fit my needs. Either the company didn’t produce more than one model or the rest of the firearms from that company didn’t make the cut. So here is the rest of the best!

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

FNS-9 Compact

Compact

$599

12+1

23.40

5.20

1.35

6.70

Ruger LC9

Slimline

$449

7+1

17.10

4.50

0.90

6.00

Taurus PT111 G2

Compact

$339

12+1

22.00

5.10

1.20

6.30

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FN FNS-9 Compact

FNS9C

Back in the day when I spent too much time on the forums reading about the latest fad firearms, I read about the great Glock killer, the FN FNP. I had to have one!  I ran out to the local shop and got one for $375.00 and a case of 9mm and the game was on.  I fired every round of that ammo then promptly traded in the gun the next day. It was total crap!

But FN finally pulled themselves together and made a proper pistol. The FNS is a comfortable gun to hold and fire, accurate, and reliable enough to carry the FN Herstal name. I mean, these guys made the M249 Saw.  Surely, they can make a simple handgun.

The price on this gun is about right and all the specs lineup with what a good concealed carry gun should be. What more could you ask for?  It may not be the best on the market, but it is a far shot above a lot of guns out there.

Ruger LC9

RugerLC9

I am going to start by saying that I love this little tinker-toy of a gun. I would never say that Ruger is my favorite gun company, but I seem to own more Ruger’s than any other brand, like 30 or so. Rugers just seem to work.

As for the LC9 specifically, this thing is miniscule! I carried this gun for several days in an appendix holster and it just felt like I should put it in my pocket instead. Of all the guns on this list, this is the smallest, lightest, and most concealable option and for a price that is difficult to beat. I picked up mine for $250.00!

Don’t let that lead you to believe the LC9 has it all because it certainly doesn’t have accuracy. It is also prone to malfunction if the shooter doesn't keep their wrist stiff and isn’t that easy to hold on to. But when it comes down to needing a very concealable handgun for lighter clothing, there is no other option that can do what this little devil does.

Taurus PT111 G2

Tauruspt111G2

Oh, the Taurus Millennium… Never have I banged my head so hard on a range bench than trying to get one of these centered on paper. Is it just me, or is there never enough left adjustment on the sights?  Still, when asking around these were among the most commonly carried pistols.

To be fair, the ones I shot for this article all did well, though they still shot a little to the right. I know those chambered for .40 cal can have some feed issues, but those chambered in 9mm all performed better than I could have hoped. There were no hang ups, no failures after the first 50 rounds, and were quite comfortable to fire.

The main reason you will find this gun on the list is purely for its cost. I would beg a person to consider a better option from one of the more reputable companies. However, for the money, I think the PT111 would do the trick if a person simply couldn’t afford a better option. Without a doubt, it’s better than no gun at all.


WHY 9MM ANYWAY?

For those of you considering your first carry gun and want to know why you should get a 9mm over other calibers, here you go!

I would hazard to say that the 9x19 is the most prolific pistol cartridge in the world. It has been the standard pistol caliber of the U.S. Military since 1985 and for NATO and several other nations for decades longer. The FBI recently made the switch back from the .40 and it appears that some police agencies and U.S. special forces units may be doing the same.

The 9mm Browning Hi Power may be the most prolific handgun ever produced with more than 1.5 million in service since its advent in the 1930s. Though some modern manufacturers are growing to challenge that record, the fact that the Hi Power in 9mm has proven a solid tool for personal defense and combat for over 80 years should validate the effectiveness of the 9x19mm round.

If you are under the impression that 9mm is just a pea shooter round, it may be time to rethink that opinion. It is very possible that the 9mm has been used in more combat scenarios, police encounters, and defensive situations than any other caliber ever manufactured. If this has worked for so long, why change now?


WHY THESE GUNS?

There are a number of factors that were considered in choosing the 9mm handguns in our list. We wanted a fair comparison, but we also wanted to ensure we were picking the right guns to compare.  There are hundreds of options in 9mm handguns, we had to have a way to narrow down the options.

Availability: We wanted guns that could be purchased locally no matter the area you lived in. If you have a big store like Cabela’s or just a small mom & pop, you should be able to find these guns.

Reliability: Everyone wants to claim their gun is perfect and never has a jam, but we wanted extensive evidence. It may not be empirical evidence, but it was gathered from reliable sources.

Concealability: There aren’t any full-sized handguns here. Yes, there are people that conceal a Glock 17, but there are people out there that could probably conceal a Mossberg 500. We wanted guns that were easy to carry and conceal for a wide range of body shapes and sizes.


OUR RANKINGS

Now is my favorite part where I get to make everyone mad by telling them what I think are the best options. But hate if you want to, your mileage with a specific gun may vary, but from my own experience, these are the ones I would pick.

Be sure to view your favorites here at Brownells...the often have FREE SHIPPING or discount codes on the front page.

Best Compact Carry Guns

  1. Glock 19
  2. S&W M&P 9c
  3. Sig P320c

These were all easy choices. I admit the H&K is a tempting choice, but I think I get a better gun out of any of the above for the money.

I have carried a G19 for a long time and have shot thousands of rounds through it during my own range time and at sanctioned classes and matches. Consistently, I have seen far less issues out of a Glock than any other brand on the market.

The M&P took some time to grow on me, I will admit. But like the Glock, I see very few malfunctions.  They are a solid firearm and worthy of the reputation they are building.

I love Sig pistols. I don’t own many because they are far from cheap, but the ones I have are solid and dependable weapons. I started my affair with the P239  years ago, but the ammo capacity killed it.  I am happy to see the P320 step into that role and do it very well. This is also the most accurate pistol on this list.

Best Subcompact Carry Guns

  1. Sig P320 Subcompact
  2. Glock 26
  3. H&K VP9SK

Sorry, this may be getting a bit redundant, but there are a few firearms companies that I have learned to trust over the years. In test after test, they have proven their reliability and usability.  Every gun on this list is worthwhile, but these are the cream.

 The Sig P320 takes the lead because it is a little more comfortable to shoot and easier to shoot well. I also find it easier to conceal.  Very few guns run like a Sig and this little devil runs with the best of them.

The G26 has everything the G19 has, but smaller. I personally don’t carry one, or for that matter any sub-compact because I don’t see the tradeoff of size for ammo worth it. That said, I own a G26 and have shot the hell out of it.  It has never let me down.

The H&K is a fine firearm. The fact that it is modular means nothing to me. If I want a bigger gun I will buy one.  What does matter to me is rock hard durability and unquestionable reliability. If you fire 10,000 rounds, the Glock may edge it out, but for the number of rounds we are ever likely to fire, the VP9 keeps up.

Best Slimline Carry Guns

  1. Glock 43
  2. S&W Shield 2.0
  3. Sig P365

Yup, trends. Sorry folks, but good guns are good guns. I have tried a ton of options over the years to try to get away from Glock and I never seem to manage to. Same with Sig and the new S&W pistols.  Great is just great, nothing we can do about it.

The Glock 43 is just a great little concealable pistol. It shoots well and points well for a gun its size.  It has most of the reliability of its big brothers, and I know I can stake my life on it. If the gun fails, it's most likely my fault and not Glock’s.

I love my Shield and though I had the G43 first, both share an equal place in my lead encrusted, powder burned heart. After I got my Shield, I had to make myself carry the old G19 from time to time.  I can find no faults with this gun.

Sig makes it on this list a little dishonestly. As I said before, there were some issues early on, as well as some people that are still finding some faults.  However, many of those issues have been corrected, and the significance of carrying such a large amount of rounds in a small pistol that shoots well is hard to pass up. Just make sure to get plenty of range time in before adding it to your carry rotation. 

NEW IN 2019

Below are a few new options that have entered the market in 2019. I visited with Glock and Mossberg at SHOT Show and here is a brief overview of some of their new entries into this concealed carry gun category. Time will tell if they make our "Best List" in the future.

Mossberg MC1sc

Glock G43X and G48


IN CLOSING

I can admit to being a little bit of a gun snob, but not in brands or price. I am a snob in what works and what makes sense for me.  There were a few factors that knocked out the rest of the competitors. There was nothing arbitrary about this list, every decision had a purpose.  It may not have been empirical evidence, but I am comfortable in the anecdotal evidence behind my selection.

The first guns to go were the Springfields. The grip safety was a great idea on the 1911, but has no place on a modern handgun. In a panic situation where you are unlikely to get a proper grip on your gun, the grip safety becomes a huge liability.

Several including the Kahr, Walther, FN and Taurus just don’t have enough of a reputation yet for me to trust my life with. They functioned well in the testing I did, but with a history of not so great performance, I am just going to need to see more.

The rest of the weeding out was in the finer details. Mostly it came down to Novak sights which can make 1 handed operation of a firearm much more difficult. Once you get into the nitty gritty details on the best, little things can knock you out of the running.

Almost as important as your firearm, is making sure you have a good holster and concealed carry belt. Make sure to check out our articles on those as well! We give advice on what to look for as well as a few of our choices.

If you are looking to purchase one of these firearms, be sure to check out our article on How to Buy a Gun Online for some great tips!

So, there you have it. Plenty of great options to choose from for your concealed carry gun. Once you make your purchase, don't forget to get some training, your concealed carry insurance, a good belt and holster, and anything else you may have missed. It is all there in our Free Guide!

But I promised you a BONUS and I haven’t forgotten!

BONUS: BEST 9MM REVOLVERS

Model

Type

MSRP

Capacity

Weight Unloaded (oz)

Height

(in)

Width

(in)

Length

(in)

Ruger LCR

Revolver

$669

5

17.20

4.50

1.28

6.50

Ruger SP101

Revolver

$719

5

25.00

5.20

1.33

7.20

S&W 986

Revolver

$1149

7

31.70

5.60

1.39

7.50

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But why would you want a 9mm revolver? Well, I see a lot of value in having guns that share an ammo type. Not needing to buy a separate caliber because I am in a wheel gun mood is pretty nice. It also means that if the SHTF, I can stockpile one less caliber to keep myself ready.  Don’t worry, if 9mm revolvers aren’t your thing, we will be covering all your options in the near future.

Ruger LCR

LCR9

In the world of 9mm revolvers, the competition isn’t that stiff because there aren’t a lot of contenders. It’s sort of like Olympic Curling.  But that isn’t to take away from this fine little piece of gun technology.

This is easily the most available and cheapest 9mm revolver on the market. Luckily, it’s a good one.  If you carry 9mm, I think this is a gun you should consider investing in. It is a good pocket alternative when carrying your primary gun isn’t an option.  It’s accurate, easy to control, and won’t rock you the way most higher caliber revolvers will.

Ruger SP101

SP101

I have always had a fondness for the Ruger 5 shot revolvers.  When it comes to the 9mm option, what a great little gun! It's not as small or easy to carry as the LCR, but it will shoot circles around it all day.  I think it would be my second choice, but I would still be very happy with.

S&W 986

986

Damn, what a sweet little gun. A 7 shot 9mm revolver in a classic L frame from Smith & Wesson. I can personally assure you that this IS the revolver you want.  Hang on, I have to take a break and wipe the sweat off my hands before I can write anymore.

Seriously, I am in love with this gun. Too bad they cost a fortune and are rare as hen’s teeth. It is tack driver accurate and has enough weight to handle any recoil you might get. This may be the revolver you want, but it probably won’t be the revolver you get.  I feel privileged that I even got to fire this gun, too bad it wasn’t for sale.

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4.7/5 (3 Reviews)

9 thoughts on “21 Best Concealed Carry Guns in 9mm (2019)”

  1. Great review and suggestions. You may want to check the spec’s on the S&W M&P Shield 2.0. I think the width is more like .99 not 1.18. Take care

  2. Great run down of a lot of the popular conceal carry handguns, Corey! I own quite a few on this list. I’m an admitted Glock fanboy but also have a good size Kahr collection. I wouldn’t consider Kahr second tier, but actually one of the pioneers of the single stack deep conceal 9mm. Their K9 (which I own) was one that LEO carried as their BUG for many years, and still one of the slimmest on the market. The big thing with Kahrs is they do require a break in period of approximately 250 rounds due to their tight tolerances. I do this with any handgun I consider for my own carry rotation though so for me that is just part of the normal procedure when I buy a new gun. Running a wide variety of range and carry ammo thru them to see if the particular gun is ammo picky or there are any FTF/FTE issues. Kahr came out with the S series last year which is the first line they say does not require a break in period due to the process they go thru on the manufacturing line.

    As I said, I’m an admitted Glock fanboy, and my personal Glocks make up the largest part of my collection. A Glock 19 is the largest that I typically IWB carry during our favorite “layer” months. Most of the time I’m carrying my Walther PPS M2 LE (IWB @ approx 7:30-8:00 as I’m a lefty), or my Kahr CW380 for pocket carry in a Desantis Nemesis holster. The Kahr just disappears in the pocket and I find I not only shoot it better than my Glock 42, but it’s also smaller with the same 6+1 capacity. In fact, my Kahr CM9 is smaller than the 42 and that packs 6+1 of 9mm.

    Right now the PPS M2 LE is my go to carry gun in a Clinger No Print Wonder IWB holster. I love the size and how it fits in my hand. I can shoot it almost as good as my larger frame guns. It’s been ultra reliable and while the trigger is no PPQ trigger, it’s more than decent for what the gun is designed for. So many people get hung up on trigger feel, reset, break, etc on guns they plan to carry or use for home defense. I highly doubt if I was ever to use a gun for defensive purposes I would be able to remember the trigger pull or reset after the fact. I also don’t see it making THAT big of a difference in the ability to stop the threat either. Training is the best thing you can do to give you the defensive edge.

    I do also rotate the Kahr CM9, and a CW9, also in a Clinger No Print Wonder. Out of the drawer full of holsters I have, the No Print Wonder wins hands down for me. It rides very comfortably even with my tactical love handles, and it pulls the grip of the gun in tight to print less for me.

    My belt of choice are the ones by 30dollargunbelt.com they are an amazing value that most people don’t even know about.

    Again thanks for the run down and interesting read, there are a lot of good options here for people to consider!

    Stay safe!

    -Bill

    1. At the time of writing, I had not had too much time behind CZ pistols. However, I have been working on that and will be updating this article to attempt to include CZ do to numerous requests. Do you have a CZ that you like best?

  3. I was reading your comment about the Taurus millennium not shooting straight. I don’t own this gun but I do own a Taurus 24/7 OSS DS full size 9mm w/ 5 1/4 in barrell. It constantly shoots right even when in a gun vise. It does however have one of the best triggers I’ve ever experienced on a handgun. It’s my go to home defense gun.

  4. Walther is not made by Smith & Wesson. S&W was the importer for Walther from 2000-2013 and the only gun they made for Walther was the PPK & PPK/S from 2000-2013. Since early 2013 the two companies are not connected.

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